Quantcast


Last updated: July 23. 2013 3:23PM - 2781 Views
By Ralph Davis



Deanna Vaughn says the drain system's inability to handle heavy rains frequently floods her Dwale neighborhood, but Sunday was the first time the rain made it into her home.
Deanna Vaughn says the drain system's inability to handle heavy rains frequently floods her Dwale neighborhood, but Sunday was the first time the rain made it into her home.
Story Tools:

Font Size:

Social Media:

DWALE — Deanna Vaughn says a faulty drain installed by the county several years ago leaves her on edge, every time it rains. Holding her thumb and forefinger less than a centimeter apart, she explains why.


“Every time it comes a big downpour, the water comes this close to getting in my house,” Vaughn said.


Sunday’s rain, however, pushed Vaughn on over the edge, as floodwaters entered her home and outbuilding. Now, she says, she wants the county to pay for the damages, which include ruined laminate flooring and a flooded lawnmower.


Vaughn says the water was never a problem before the county installed a new drain, which is supposed to siphon water from one side of the railroad into a drainage ditch on the other side. Instead, she says, the drain is unable to keep up with the runoff from a heavy rain, causing water to back up.


Vaughn says she has reported the problem to the county and the railroad several times, but says each one blames the other for the problem and nothing gets done.


Contacted by The Times Tuesday, County Judge-Executive R.D. “Doc” Marshall declined to comment on the situation.


“This was all done before I came into office,” Marshall said. He suggested that road supervisor Mike Jarrell would be better able to speak about the situation.


Calls from The Times to Jarrell’s cell phone went unanswered Tuesday, and his voicemail inbox was full.


 
Comments
comments powered by Disqus



Featured Businesses


Poll



Info Minute



Gas Prices

Prestonsburg Gas Prices provided by GasBuddy.com